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William Wallace Before the Battle of Stirling Bridge by Mark Churms. (B)


William Wallace Before the Battle of Stirling Bridge by Mark Churms. (B)

With Edward I absent from Scotland the land soon slips once more into open insurrection. Though not of noble birth, William Wallace, by brutally slaying the Sheriff of Lanark in vengeance for the murder of Wallaces new bride and her servants, soon comes to embody the Scottish Nationalist cause. Through his popularity and military skill, he is able to rapidly unify the rebellious bands into a single, cohesive fighting force. An English army is sent north to defeat the Scots and capture Wallace and the only noble to come to Wallaces assistance, is his friend Andrew Murray. Other Scottish landowners are too timid and fear the consequences. The armies meet at Stirling and the English begin to deploy across the narrow wooden bridge which spans the River Forth. Whilst the English commanders bicker about their battle plan, Wallace seizes the moment and blows his horn. Upon this signal, the massed ranks of Scottish spearmen charge forward across the open boggy ground towards the bridge!
Item Code : DHM0364BWilliam Wallace Before the Battle of Stirling Bridge by Mark Churms. (B) - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 2500 prints.

Image size 8 inches x 12 inches (20cm x 31cm)Artist : Mark Churms20 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : 35.00

Quantity:
EXCLUSIVE website offer from Cranston Fine Arts - FREE art print(s) supplied with the above item!


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FREE PRINT : After the Battle by Sir William Allen.

This complimentary art print worth 14
(Size : 8 inches x 12 inches (20cm x 31cm))
has been specially chosen by Cranston Fine Arts to complement the above edition, and will be sent FREE with your order.

This item can be viewed or purchased separately in our shop, HERE


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Other editions of this item : William Wallace Before the Battle of Stirling Bridge by Mark Churms.DHM0364
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 2500 prints. Image size 16 inches x 24 inches (41cm x 61cm)Artist : Mark Churms40 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : 55.00VIEW EDITION...
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 16 inches x 24 inches (41cm x 61cm)Artist : Mark Churms55 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : 80.00VIEW EDITION...
ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original painting by Mark Churms. Image size 40 inches x 30 inches (102cm x 76cm)Artist : Mark Churms1000 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : 6000.00VIEW EDITION...
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Signed limited edition of 2500 prints. (One copy reduced to clear)

Ex-display copy - near perfect condition.
Image size 16 inches x 24 inches (41cm x 61cm)Artist : Mark Churms65 Off!Now : 30.00VIEW EDITION...
Extra Details : William Wallace Before the Battle of Stirling Bridge by Mark Churms. (B)
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