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VCP, Northern Ireland by John Wynne Hopkins.


VCP, Northern Ireland by John Wynne Hopkins.

A vehicle checkpoint set up by the British army in co-operation with the RUC while operating in Northern Ireland.
Item Code : DHM0847VCP, Northern Ireland by John Wynne Hopkins. - This Edition
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 25 inches x 16 inches (64cm x 41cm)Artist : John Wynne Hopkins£40 Off!Now : £70.00

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The Tragedy of Ulster 1976 by Terence Cuneo.
for £180 -
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Private Kenneth Cross, 1st Battalion The Queens Lancashire Regiment Winning the Military Medal Belfast 1973 by David Rowlands (GL)
for £530 -
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Orders Group by John Wynne Hopkins.
for £125 -
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Pup Northern Ireland by John Wynne Hopkins.
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Northern Ireland Troubles Print Pack.

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3 other prints in this pack :
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Titles in this pack :
The Tragedy of Ulster 1976 by Terence Cuneo.  (View This Item)
Leeson Street Patrol by Terence Cuneo.  (View This Item)
VCP Northern Ireland by John Wynne Hopkins.  (View This Item)
Pup Northern Ireland by John Wynne Hopkins.  (View This Item)

British Troops in Northern Ireland Print Pack.

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3 other prints in this pack :
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Pack price : £170 - Save £250

Titles in this pack :
VCP Northern Ireland by John Wynne Hopkins.  (View This Item)
Pup Northern Ireland by John Wynne Hopkins.  (View This Item)
Eagle Patrol by John Wynne Hopkins.  (View This Item)
Five of Nines by John Wynne Hopkins.  (View This Item)

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Other editions of this item : VCP, Northern Ireland by Anthony Wynne Hopkins DHM0847
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ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 25 inches x 16 inches (64cm x 41cm)Artist : £20 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : £120.00VIEW EDITION...
ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original painting by John Wynne Hopkins. Image size 40 inches x 30 inches (102cm x 76cm)Artist : Half Price!Now : £3000.00VIEW EDITION...
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Signed limited edition of 1150 prints. (One print reduced to clear.

Ex display print in near perfect condition with very little border damage and some light marks on image which would not be noticeable once framed
Image size 25 inches x 16 inches (64cm x 41cm)Artist : John Wynne Hopkins£70 Off!Now : £45.00VIEW EDITION...
Extra Details : VCP, Northern Ireland by John Wynne Hopkins.
About all editions :

Detail Images :

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 An EOD team move down a track in Helmand Province - watched by curious locals.  The lead elements carrying a 'Vallon' (IED mine detector) and a dog handler will go out in front of the main command soldiers.  If detected, the personnel seen in the rear of the group will make safe the IED and the process can begin again.

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On the night of 6th April 1812 Wellingtons Army, surrounding the walled Spanish town of Badajoz (garrisoned by Napoleons soldiers under general Baron Philippon) is ready to attack!  The men of the 45th regiment from Pictons 3rd Division launch themselves in a desperate and bloody assault against the north castle wall. Carrying improvised ladders, the men have their top buttons undone, overalls rolled up and are stripped for action.  The castles defenders (Germans, allied to Napoleon of the Graf und Erbprinz Regiment from Hesse-Darmstadt) partroling the walls in their greatcoats are intially surprised by the bold assault from this sector but they have been preparing the strong defenses for some time. Soon the night air is full of musketry, falling masonry, burning bundles of ropes and exploding grenades or mines.  Despite the horrific casualties suffered the attackers press home. As the first scaling ladders are raised near a small bell tower the young Lt. James Macpherson reaches for the top of the wall. The ladders are too short! Undaunted he cries to his men below to lift the base of the ladder closer to the wall. This rapid, vertical movement suddenly propels him to a height several feet above the Germans heads. A shot rings out as one of the defenders fires point blank into the young mans chest. Fortunately the lead ball only strikes a glancing blow, cleaving in two a button of the officers waist coat and dislocating one of his ribs. Despite his fortunate escape, the force of the impact nearly sends him tumbling from the ladder. Somehow he maintains his grasp but the ladder itself gives way under the weight of the men following. Some unfortunates are impaled on the bayonets of their comrades below.  Leaping from the rungs of another ladder, Corporal Kelly is the first man over the top and gradually the 45th gain a foothold on the ramparts. The rest of the regiment is ordered to unfix bayonets. Using the few remaining ladders, others also manage to scale the walls. Through the carnage they climb, club and shoot their way into the castle itself!  Maepherson now regains consciousness at the foot of the wall and revived with a cup of coco from his friend A.A. General Hercules Packenham, who was directly behind him on the ladder when it broke. Though winded by the shot he rises to his feet. This sudden movement relocates his rib and he is able to climb the ladders once more. Once over the defense he sees the old towers of Apendez and Albar-rana to his left and the cathedral illuminated by gun fire in the distance. However his objective is directly ahead. Atop the abandoned tower of Santa Maria before him still flies the French tricolour.  Macplierson seizes the opportunity, mounts the spiral stairway to the top turret and pulls down the enemy flag. For want of a substitute he flies his own red jacket from the pole, signifying that the castle has fallen. In the rest of the town the fighting continues and turns into a blood lust. Badajoz is one of the bloodiest and violent sieges of the Peninsula War. On the following day Maepherson presents his trophy to the Duke of Wellington himself but his bravery is not rewarded with a promotion.
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The Tigers Roar, Malinava, Latvia, July 22nd 1944 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 The Battle of Aliwal was fought on 28th January 1846 between the British and the Sikhs.  The British were led by Sir Harry Smith, while the Sikhs were led by Ranjodh Singh Majithia.  The British won a victory which is sometimes regarded as the turning point of the First Anglo-Sikh War.  The Sikhs had occupied a position 4 miles (6.4 km) long, which ran along a ridge between the villages of Aliwal, on the Sutlej, and Bhundri.  The Sutlej ran close to their rear for the entire length of their line, making it difficult for them to manoeuvre and also potentially disastrous if they were forced to retreat.  After the initial artillery salvoes, Smith determined that Aliwal was the Sikh weak point.  He sent two of his four infantry brigades to capture the village, from where they could enfilade the Sikh centre.  They seized the village, and began pressing forwards to threaten the fords across the Sutlej.  As the Sikhs tried to swing back their left, pivoting on Bhundri, some of their cavalry tried to threaten the open British left flank.  A British and Indian cavalry brigade, led by the 16th Lancers, charged and dispersed them.  The 16th Lancers then attacked a large body of Sikh infantry.  These were battalions organised and trained in contemporary European fashion by Neapolitan mercenary, Paolo Di Avitabile.  They formed square to receive cavalry, as most European armies did.  Nevertheless, the 16th Lancers broke them, with heavy casualties.  The infantry in the Sikh centre tried to defend a nullah (dry stream bed), but were enfiladed and forced into the open by a Bengal infantry regiment, and then cut down by fire from Smith's batteries of Bengal Horse Artillery.  Unlike most of the battles of both Anglo-Sikh Wars, when the Sikhs at Aliwal began to retreat, the retreat quickly turned into a disorderly rout across the fords.  Most of the Sikh guns were abandoned, either on the river bank or in the fords, along with all baggage, tents and supplies.  They lost 2,000 men and 67 guns. <i><br><br>Comment from the artist, Jason Askew.</i><br><br>This painting shows the extremely violent and brutal clash between British cavalry (16th Lancers) and Sikh infantry at the battle of Aliwal.  The Sikh infantry formed 2 triangles, a version of the famous Allied/British squares used at Waterloo, but the Sikhs, after firing a ragged volley at the attacking horsemen, dropped their muskets and assaulted the cavalry with their traditional Tulwars (sabres) and dhal shields.  These shields are also used offensively, to punch, and to slice with the edge.  Although the British horsemen claimed a victory as they felt they successfully dispersed the Sikh triangles, and forced the Sikh infantry to retreat to the nullah (dry stream bed) in the Sikh rear, this opinion is open to debate.  The Sikhs traditionally fought in loose formations, with tulwar and shield-taking full advantage of their abilities as swordsmen, blades being weapons with which the Sikhs are particularly skilled in the use of.  The Sikhs actually inflicted more casualties on the 16th Lancers than the lancers inflicted on the Sikh infantry.  British eye witnesses spoke of the sight of the grotesquely swollen and distorted dead bodies of men and horses of the Her Majesty's 16th Lancers, stinking in the sun and littering the ground at Aliwal - testimony to the progress of their charge.  The regiment lost 27% of effectives out of a total strength of over 400 effectives.  The lancers were dreadfully hacked about, many being cruelly maimed for life, losing hands and limbs to the slashing strokes of the Sikh blades.  The Sikhs had no compassion for the cavalry horses either - many of the poor animals (over 100 by some accounts) had to be shot, due to having their legs hacked clean off, or being literally disemboweled by Sikh Tulwars.  In the painting, the central figure with the wizard-shaped Turban, is in fact an Akali - a sect of extremely religious Sikhs, who disdained the use of armour, and often fought to the death with a fanatical and suicidal devotion.

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