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The Return of the Carabiniers after the Charge by Edouard Detaille. (Y)


The Return of the Carabiniers after the Charge by Edouard Detaille. (Y)

The Carabiniers return after their successful charge and with a captured Russian standard.
Item Code : DHM0876YThe Return of the Carabiniers after the Charge by Edouard Detaille. (Y) - This Edition
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. (One reduced to clear)

Ex display canvas in near perfect condition.
Image size 30 inches x 40 inches (76cm x 102cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : £300.00

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All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling



Other editions of this item : The Return of the Carabiniers after the Charge by Edouard Detaille.DHM0876
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print. Image size 17 inches x 25 inches (43cm x 64cm)none£20 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : £40.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 40 inches (76cm x 102cm)none£100 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : £500.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 22 inches x 30 inches (56cm x 76cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£390.00VIEW EDITION...

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