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Morris and Hillman by David Pentland. (P)


Morris and Hillman by David Pentland. (P)

Near Caen, D-Day, 6th June 1944. Vickers heavy machinegun team of the British 3rd Division, Monty's Ironsides, in action against the German strong points Morris and Hillman. The division comprised of the 2nd East Yorkshires, 1st South Lancashires, 1st Suffolks, 2nd Lincolnshires, 1st King's Own Scottish Borderers, 2nd Royal Ulster Rifles, 2nd Warwickshires, 1st Norfolks, and 2nd King's Shropshire Light Infantry.
Item Code : DHM6005PMorris and Hillman by David Pentland. (P) - This Edition
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original painting, oil on canvas by David Pentland.

Size 16 inches x 12 inches (41cm x 31cm)Artist : David PentlandHalf
Price!
Now : 700.00

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All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling



Other editions of this item : Morris and Hillman by David Pentland.DHM6005
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 50 prints. Image size 16 inches x 12 inches (41cm x 31cm)Artist : David Pentland20 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : 75.00VIEW EDITION...
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 20 artist proofs. Image size 16 inches x 12 inches (41cm x 31cm)Artist : David Pentland110.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of up to 10 giclee canvas prints. Size 20 inches x 16 inches (51cm x 41cm)Artist : David Pentland
on separate certificate
20 Off!Now : 250.00VIEW EDITION...

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