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Morris and Hillman by David Pentland. (P)


Morris and Hillman by David Pentland. (P)

Near Caen, D-Day, 6th June 1944. Vickers heavy machinegun team of the British 3rd Division, Monty's Ironsides, in action against the German strong points Morris and Hillman. The division comprised of the 2nd East Yorkshires, 1st South Lancashires, 1st Suffolks, 2nd Lincolnshires, 1st King's Own Scottish Borderers, 2nd Royal Ulster Rifles, 2nd Warwickshires, 1st Norfolks, and 2nd King's Shropshire Light Infantry.
Item Code : DHM6005PMorris and Hillman by David Pentland. (P) - This Edition
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original painting, oil on canvas by David Pentland. 

Size 16 inches x 12 inches (41cm x 31cm)Artist : David PentlandHalf
Price!
Now : £700.00

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Other editions of this item : Morris and Hillman by David Pentland.DHM6005
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned limited edition of 50 prints. Image size 16 inches x 12 inches (41cm x 31cm)Artist : David Pentland£35 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £75.00VIEW EDITION...
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 20 artist proofs. Image size 16 inches x 12 inches (41cm x 31cm)Artist : David Pentland£35 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £100.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of up to 10 giclee canvas prints. Size 20 inches x 16 inches (51cm x 41cm)Artist : David Pentland
on separate certificate
£20 Off!Now : £250.00VIEW EDITION...

This Week's Half Price Art

Battle of Crecy.  One of the battles fought during the Hundred Years War, on 26th August 1346. On 12th July Edward III landed in Normandy with his army and marching north plundered the countryside. King Philip VI assembled an army to stop Edward and tracked them across the Somme River. When Edward reached Crecy he stopped and ordered his army to take up defensive positions. King Philip surveyed the English positions and decided to postpone his attack until August 27th. However, the French vanguard pressed forward too far and so committed the entire army to the battle. The hired Genoese crossbowmen began the assault but came under severe attack from the English longbows and so fled to the rear. King Philip then ordered his cavalry to charge resulting in a huge loss of horse and man under the barrage of arrows which rained down on them. By the end of the night after several unsuccessful assaults the French army was reduced by a third and King John of Luxemburg was dead. Edward then turned towards Calais.

The Black Prince Before the Battle of Crecy by Mark Churms.
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MARK5. Original Oil Study of Officer Skinners Horse painting by Mark Churms.
Original Oil Study of Officer Skinners Horse painting by Mark Churms. (P)
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 1st Battalion in action at Escaut Canal, Belgium, May 1940. The last Highland Regiment to wear a kilt in battle, attacking the Germans at the River Escaut.  From the Diary of Captain R. Leah, 1st Battalion, Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders : Tuesday 21st May : Bn left Ere about 2 a.m. to march back. Fortunately Coy Cmdr. were required for some sort of recce and we went in C.O.s car.  Arrived Taintignies 3 a.m. and self went out again with Wilkie in C.O.s car to look for for C Coy which had gone astray, and to see Q.M. about Bn rations in Wez-Velvain.  Could not find either.  Met the Battalion arriving from Ere when I left the village at 3 a.m.  Got back myself at 4 a.m. found empty house which I entered by window and slept well for 5 hours. Officers mess going in house beside M.T. park, and had good breakfast.  Fairly quiet morning and orders to move this afternoon to Bn assembly position S of Wez-Velvain.  Thence we were directed to Merlin and prepared for counter-attack to drive enemy off Western side of Escaut.

The Queens Own Cameron Highlanders by David Rowlands (C)
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 Sgt. Ian John McKay VC calls for covering fire as he leads forward elements of 4 and 5 platoon of B Company 3 Para, to assault Argentinean positions held by 7th Infantry regiment, Falklands War 11th -12th June 1982.

Battle for Mount Longdon by Mark Churms. (P)
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<b>Ex-display prints in near perfect condition. </b>
Napoleon at the Battle of Borodino by Robert Hillingford. (Y)
Half Price! - £25.00
 A Tiger I and PAK 40 anti tank gun of the Müncheberg Division, field a final defence of the capital in front of the Brandenburg Gate under the shattered remains of the famous Linden trees. The under-strength division had just been formed the previous month from a mixture of ad hoc units and various marks of tank. Despite this it put up a spirited fight until its final destruction in early May.

Tiger at the Gate, Berlin, 30th april 1945 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
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This Week's Half Price Sport Art

David Coulthard made his Grand Prix debut at the Spanish Grand Prix in 1994.  Only an electrical problem with his Williams Renault stopped Coulthard finishing 3rd in his first ever Grand Prix.  This performance was enough to confirm his potential and earn a drive for the 1995 season.  Winning at Estoril, on the podium at Interlagos, Magny-Cours, Silverstone, Hockenheim, Hungaroring and T I Aida, placed him third in the championship in his first full Grand Prix season.  Coulthard moved to McLaren for the 1996 season proving on many occasions that he could match the pace of team leader Mika Hakkinen, who has a reputation as one of the fastest.  For 1997, Coulthard took over the mantle of Britains No.1 driver and was well qualified to do so.  Winning at Melbourne and Monza, second at A1 Ring and Jerez.  Fourth in the championship prior to Schumachers exclusion.  Coulthard drives with a balance of flair and aggression which earned him considerable respect.  After nearly fifteen years as a top flight driver, Coulthard has now retired from driving, leaving a remarkable legacy behind him.  Twice winner of the British Grand Prix in 1999 and 2000, he has represented Scotland and Great Britain at the highest level of motorsport for well over a decade.

Tribute to David Coulthard by Stuart McIntyre
Half Price! - £23.00
 A great tribute to one of the all time greats in golf who will be sadly missed.

Seve Ballesteros by Peter Deighan. (Y)
Half Price! - £80.00
 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the ¾ stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - £75.00
 England 1 Germany 0, Euro 2000.  On the 17th of June 2000 England once again faced their old nemesis Germany in a Group A qualifying match at Euro 2000.  England entered the game knowing that they had not defeated Germany in a competitive match since the famous World Cup victory in 1966.  Germany made four changes to the side that had drawn with Romania including the introduction of midfielder Sebastian Deisler, whilst England had been forced to replace Tony Adams and Steve McManaman with Martin Keown and Dennis Wise due to injury.  As expected the game started at a frenetic pace and Jancker made things difficult for England's central defenders early on with his height and strength.  England appeared to be lacking cohesion and allowed Germany to take control of the game.  Deisler brought the German crowd to their feet with a clever run down the right hand side and minutes later Hamaan had their first strike on goal which was hit directly at David Seaman.  England were looking for a flash of inspiration and it was very nearly delivered as Michael Owen managed to meet Phil Neville's cross with his head but only managed to direct the ball on to the post.  Paul Scholes in typical fashion drove a ferocious volley, which was tipped just over the bar, and suddenly it appeared that England were beginning to find some weaknesses in certain areas of the German side.  At the interval little separated the two sides however, England started the second half with a steely determination.  After just seven minutes David Beckham earned his side a free kick in a very dangerous position on the England right.  With good movement from the forwards in the German area Beckham swung a speculative cross into the six yard box.  Owen, beaten by the pace, failed to connect but man of the match Alan Shearer anticipated the kind bounce and without hesitation headed the ball back across Kahn and into the right hand side of the German goal.  The England captain had broken the deadlock and instilled in his side the belief that they could finally defeat their oldest rivals.  Germany threw everything they had at England but Keegan's team were equal to the task in every area of the pitch.  As the final whistle blew a huge roar erupted from the England supporters as Alan Shearer's goal had ended over thirty years of frustration and sealed his place in the history books as one of England's greatest ever strikers.

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