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The Battle of Quebec, 13th September 1759 by David Rowlands. (Y)


The Battle of Quebec, 13th September 1759 by David Rowlands. (Y)

Captain W Macleods Company, 1st Battalion Royal Artillery. Battle of Quebec 13th September 1759 was Wolfs final attempt to take the city. His army scaled the cliffs from Wolfes cove and fought the French army which was larger than Wolfes on the Plains of Abraham. During this battle General Wolfe was hit twice and eventually mortally wounded when a bullet passed through his lungs. As he lay dying he heard someone shout They run - see how they run. Wolfe gave his last order to cut of the enemies retreat and his last words being Now God be praised. I will die in peace.
Item Code : DHM0354YThe Battle of Quebec, 13th September 1759 by David Rowlands. (Y) - This Edition
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EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Signed special edition print. (One print reduced to clear)

Print has some damage to white border due to damp dust marks, plus some marks on image that would not be very noticeable once framed.
Image size 23 inches x 15 inches (58cm x 38cm)Artist : David Rowlands65 Off!Now : 20.00

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Other editions of this item : The Battle of Quebec, 13th September 1759 by David Rowlands.DHM0354
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTSigned special edition print. Image size 23 inches x 15 inches (58cm x 38cm)Artist : David Rowlands30 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : 65.00VIEW EDITION...
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 23 inches x 15 inches (58cm x 38cm)Artist : David Rowlands60 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : 95.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINT Signed open edition print. Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)Artist : David RowlandsHalf Price!Now : 20.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTOpen edition print. Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!14.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)Artist : David Rowlands
on separate certificate
Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!500.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : David Rowlands
on separate certificate
Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!390.00VIEW EDITION...

This Week's Half Price Art

<b>Slightly noticeable mark on the image - hence the low price of this item. </b>

Yorkist Soldier by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
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Half Price! - 80.00
 Depicting soldiers of the French Second Empire dreaming of the victorious French Army of the Napoleonic period.
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Half Price! - 30.00

 Themistocles had chosen the narrow waters at the entrance to the bay well. The Persians could not bring their larger fleet to bear on the smaller Greek fleet and due to the design and manoeuverability of the Greek Triremes, the Greek fleet sailed down the right channel next to Salamis and turned to ram the Persian fleet as it entered the bay. The Persian captains tried frantically to turn their ships but their oars became entangled and the turning manoeuvre caused the ships to run into each other. The Greek Triremes were able to ram the leading Persian ships, disengage and ram again. This was a great victory for Themistocles who lost only 70 ships from his fleet of 380 Triremes, compared to the loss of over 600 ships from the Persian fleet of over 1,000.

Battle of Salamis, 23rd September 480BC by Wilhelm von Kaulbach. (Y)
Half Price! - 29.00
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Half Price! - 650.00
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The Jacobite Piper by Mark Churms. (Y)
Half Price! - 65.00
The Allied breakthrough into the Normandy plain, against heavy German opposition. Filed marshall Montgomery claimed that Operation Goodwood had two major aims  the first being to break out from the beaches and the other to destroy the German armoured reserves and draw them away from the US forces that were preparing for Operation Cobra in the western sector.  The plan for the breakout began with a massive aerial bombardment, using the strategic air forces large bombers to decimate the German defending forces then Lt-General Richard OConnors VIII Corps comprising three whole armoured divisions  11th, 7th and Guards - and spearheaded by Major-General Pip Roberts 11th would then rush forward, overwhelm the defending Germans and causing the armoured forces to move forward and break out from the beach areas. To cover the flanks the Canadians would fight their way to Caen, while the British 3rd Infantry and 51st Highland Divisions would cover the left flank,  and move further eastward.

Operation Goodwood, Caen, Normandy, 18th-19th July, 1944 by David Rowlands (C)
Half Price! - 20.00

This Week's Half Price Sport Art

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Half Price! - 40.00
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