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The Battle of Quebec, 13th September 1759 by David Rowlands. (Y)


The Battle of Quebec, 13th September 1759 by David Rowlands. (Y)

Captain W Macleods Company, 1st Battalion Royal Artillery. Battle of Quebec 13th September 1759 was Wolfs final attempt to take the city. His army scaled the cliffs from Wolfes cove and fought the French army which was larger than Wolfes on the Plains of Abraham. During this battle General Wolfe was hit twice and eventually mortally wounded when a bullet passed through his lungs. As he lay dying he heard someone shout They run - see how they run. Wolfe gave his last order to cut of the enemies retreat and his last words being Now God be praised. I will die in peace.
Item Code : DHM0354YThe Battle of Quebec, 13th September 1759 by David Rowlands. (Y) - This Edition
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EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Signed special edition print. (One print reduced to clear)

Print has some damage to white border due to damp dust marks, plus some marks on image that would not be very noticeable once framed.
Image size 23 inches x 15 inches (58cm x 38cm)Artist : David Rowlands£45 Off!Now : £40.00

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Other editions of this item : The Battle of Quebec, 13th September 1759 by David Rowlands.DHM0354
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PRINTSigned special edition print. Image size 23 inches x 15 inches (58cm x 38cm)Artist : David Rowlands£30 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £65.00VIEW EDITION...
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 23 inches x 15 inches (58cm x 38cm)Artist : David Rowlands£60 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £95.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINT Signed open edition print. Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)Artist : David RowlandsHalf Price!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : £20.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTOpen edition print. Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£14.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)Artist : David Rowlands
on separate certificate
Half Price!Now : £300.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : David Rowlands
on separate certificate
Half Price!Now : £250.00VIEW EDITION...

This Week's Half Price Art

 The decisive battle of the War of the Roses was fought near Market Bosworth. Richard of Gloucester, the last Plantagenate King of England was to try consequences with Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond. The bloody conflict began in the traditional manner with the opposing armies drawn up in line. facing one another, except for the forces of Thomas Neville, Lord Stanley, as yeyt uncommitted to either side. King Richard, the Third of that name, is seated astride his grey charger in his fine blued harness. He is accompanied by his personal standard and the royal standard, alongside that of Lord Zouch to his right. His herald, trumpet are at his side. To his left Richards Chamberlain and Admiral, Viscount Lord Lovel, sits ready, astride his mount. To the rear we see the rest of the household and choice force of cavalry, kept out of shot to avoid unnecessary casualties amongst the expensive war horses.  After the opening deadly arrow storm, boys hurriedly collect fallen arrows for Richards men to shoot back. In the front line crossbowmen return fire from behind the safety of their decorated pavaises (painted with the suns and white roses of York and the white boar, Richards badge). Close by a gentleman at arms, mortally wounded by an iron ball fired from a hand gonne is dragged from the field by his page. Sir Walter Devereux (Lord Ferrers) accompanied by his standard is encouraging his household (soldiers wearing his livery colours ) to attack.  However, there is a marked reluctance on both sides to join the vicious close quarter combat of handstrokes and only in the centre is there any heavy fighting. Richard is informed by his herald that Henry and his household have been recognised and are now within charge distance. Faced with his armies reluctance to come to grips with the enemy, he decides to force battle himself by leading his own household, the Choice Force, in a desperate charge against Henry seeking to engage him in single combat.  Characteristically leading from the front Richard slays many a knight, including William Brandon (Henrys standard bearer) in his vain attempt to kill his rival. At this crucial moment Lord Stanley decides to join Henrys cause, attacks the choice force and drives it from the field. In the brutal hand to hand fighting the king is unhorsed and though surrounded, fights to the end.  -KingRichard alone was killed fighting manfully in the thickest press of his enemies - his courage was high and fierce and failed him not even at the death which when his men forsook him, he preferred to take by the sword, rather than by foul flight to prolong his life- (Polydore Virgil)

Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth, 22nd August 1485 by Mark Churms. (Y)
Half Price! - £35.00
 KFORs route into Kosovo led through a long narrow gorge, with its bridges and tunnels reportedly well mined. On 12th June 1999, after key points were secured by airborne forces, 4th Armoured Brigade crossed the border. Though the Kacanik Defile was perfect for ambush, the advance went smoothly, and the armoured vehicles of the Irish Guards led the advance into the capital city of Pristina the following day.
1st Battalion Irish Guards in the Kacanik Defile, Kosovo Operation Agricola by David Rowlands. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
The Carabiniers return after their successful charge and with a captured Russian standard.
The Return of the Carabiniers after the Charge by Edouard Detaille. (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
By about 6pm the Zulu attacks had extended all around the front of the post, and fighting raged at hand-to-hand along the mealie-bag wall. Lieutenant Chard himself took up a position on the barricade, firing over the mealie-bags with a Martini-Henry, whilst Lieutenant Bromhead directed any spare men to plug the gaps in the line. The men in the yard and on the front wall were dangerously exposed to the fire of Zulu marksmen posted in the rocky terraces on Shiyane (Oskarsberg) hill behind the post. Several men were hit, including Acting Assistant Commissary Dalton, and Corporal Allen of the 14th. Surgeon Reynolds treated the wounded as best he could despite the fire. Once the veranda at the front of the hospital had been abandoned, the Zulus had mounted a determined attack on the building itself, setting fire to the thatched roof with spears tied with burning grass. The defenders were forced to evacuate the patients room by room, eventually passing them out through a small window into the open yard. Shortly after 6pm Chard decided that the Zulu pressure was too great, and ordered a withdrawal to a barricade of biscuit boxes which had been hastily erected across the yard, from the corner of the store-house to the front mealie-bag wall. In this small compound the garrison would fight for their lives throughout most of the coming night.

The Defense of Rorkes Drift by Alphonse De Neuville (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

 With the full might of Englands Army now gathered to do battle before the besieged Stirling Castle, the young Edward II Plantagenate is confident of victory over the enemy. To the west of the Bannockburn, Robert Bruce, King of Scots kneels to pray with his men and commends his soul to God. The Scottish battle lines are prepared. The Cavalry is in reserve to the rear behind the spearmen and archers (known as Flower of the forest) in tightly packed Schiltrons patiently awaiting the coming onslaught. Unknown to the English, the open marshy ground of no mans land conceals hidden pits and trenches, major obstacles for any mounted charge.  Despite Cliffords and de Beaumonts premature and unsuccessful attempt to relieve the castle the day before, years of victory have taught the brave English knights to regard their Scottish foes with contempt. So, without waiting for the bowmen to effectively weaken the enemy lines the order is hurriedly given to attack! With one rush hundreds of mounted knights led by the impetuous Earl of Gloucester thunder headlong through the boggy ground straight for the impenetrable forest of spears and into defeat and death.  With dash and courage the knights try to force a way through the mass of spears but the Scots stand firm. The momentum of the charge is lost and there is no room to manoeuvre. Everywhere horses and men crash to the ground, casualties amongst the English are horrific. Robert Bruce seizes the moment and orders the exultant army to advance. The Englishmen are slowly pushed back into the waters of the Bannockburn. All discipline is lost as the soldiers and horses madly scramble for the far bank of the burn. Many drown or perish in the crush to escape the deadly melee. Edward II, with his army destroyed, flees with his bodyguard for the safety of Stirling Castle but is refused refuge and has to fight his way south to England. For Robert Bruce and Scotland victory is complete.
Text by Paul Scarron-Jones.

The Battle of Bannockburn by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - £70.00
 Coming into action in Iraq, February 1991.

M109 Howitzers of 127 (Dragon) Field Battery Royal Artillery by David Rowlands. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Banikju, Northern Helmand, Afghanistan, 2007. A team from 42 Royal Marines Commando break into a suspected hostile compound during <i>Operation Volcano</i>.

The Hole in the Wall Gang by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £70.00
GDHM9020GL.  1st Battalion Cheshire Regiment at Audregneis, 24th August 1914 by David Rowlands.
1st Battalion Cheshire Regiment at Audregneis, 24th August 1914 by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

This Week's Half Price Sport Art

Epsom Trophy, Polo Championship

Epsom Trophy by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - £20.00
SPC5002. Jeremy Guscott by Robert Highton.

Jeremy Guscott by Robert Highton.
Half Price! - £55.00
Florida Pearl is an Irish-bred race horse, who raced in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Florida Pearl was owned by Mrs Violet O'Leary and trained by top Irish trainer Willie Mullins.  The 2001/02 season proved to be successful for Florida Pearl, winning the John Durkan Memorial Chase.  Florida Pearl then returned to Kempton to win the King George VI Chase beating Best Mate in December.  He returned back to England for his next start in the Grade 2 Martell Cup Chase where he cruised to an 11 length victory over Cyfor Malta.  The painting shows Florida Pearl over the one of the nineteen fences to win the Martell Cup at Aintree in 2002, with Jockey  Barry Geraghty.

Florida Pearl by Stephen Smith.
Half Price! - £100.00
Neil Hodgson winning the World Superbike round at Donington Park, July 2001.
The Futures Bright by Dave Foord.
Half Price! - £90.00

 

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