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36th Ryder Cup 2006 by James Owen.


36th Ryder Cup 2006 by James Owen.

Europe 18.5 - 9.5 USA. The K Club, Straffan, Co. Kildare, Ireland, 22-24 September 2006.

Europe; Ian Woosnam - captain - Colin Montgomerie, Darren Clarke, Luke Donald, David Howell, Sergio Garcia, Paul McGinley, Lee Westwood, Paul Casey, Jose Maria Olazabel, Robert Karlsson, Padraig Harrington, Henrik Stenson.

USA; Tom Lehman - captain - Tiger Woods, Phil Mickelson, JJ Henry, David Tomms, Brett Wetterick, Stewart Cink, Jim Furyk, Chad Campbell, Chris DiMarco, Vaughan Taylor, Zach Johnson, Scott Verplank.
Item Code : SEM000336th Ryder Cup 2006 by James Owen. - This Edition
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 500 prints.

Paper size 27 inches x 22.5 inches (80cm x 54cm) Montgomerie, Colin
+ Artist : James Owen


Signature(s) value alone : 25
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Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo
Colin Montgomerie
*Signature Value : 20 (matted)

Colin Stuart Montgomerie OBE was born on the 23rd June 1963 and is a Scottish professional golfer. In his career he was ranked at one time second in the world and is often referred to by one of his nicknames "Monty". Montgomerie had one of the finest careers in Eurpean Tour golf history, having won a record eight Order of Merit titles, this including an impressive streak of seven consecutively from 1993 to 1999. Colin Montgomerie also had 31 European tour victories, placing him fourth on the all time list. He is renowned also for his superb Ryder Cup performances but Montgomery has never won a major championship despite achieving the runner-up position on five occasions.

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