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36th Ryder Cup 2006 by James Owen.


36th Ryder Cup 2006 by James Owen.

Europe 18.5 - 9.5 USA. The K Club, Straffan, Co. Kildare, Ireland, 22-24 September 2006.

Europe; Ian Woosnam - captain - Colin Montgomerie, Darren Clarke, Luke Donald, David Howell, Sergio Garcia, Paul McGinley, Lee Westwood, Paul Casey, Jose Maria Olazabel, Robert Karlsson, Padraig Harrington, Henrik Stenson.

USA; Tom Lehman - captain - Tiger Woods, Phil Mickelson, JJ Henry, David Tomms, Brett Wetterick, Stewart Cink, Jim Furyk, Chad Campbell, Chris DiMarco, Vaughan Taylor, Zach Johnson, Scott Verplank.
Item Code : SEM000336th Ryder Cup 2006 by James Owen. - This Edition
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 500 prints.

Paper size 27 inches x 22.5 inches (80cm x 54cm) Montgomerie, Colin
+ Artist : James Owen


Signature(s) value alone : £25
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Signatures on this item
*The value given for each signature has been calculated by us based on the historical significance and rarity of the signature. Values of many pilot signatures have risen in recent years and will likely continue to rise as they become more and more rare.
NameInfo
Colin Montgomerie
*Signature Value : £20 (matted)

Colin Stuart Montgomerie OBE was born on the 23rd June 1963 and is a Scottish professional golfer. In his career he was ranked at one time second in the world and is often referred to by one of his nicknames "Monty". Montgomerie had one of the finest careers in Eurpean Tour golf history, having won a record eight Order of Merit titles, this including an impressive streak of seven consecutively from 1993 to 1999. Colin Montgomerie also had 31 European tour victories, placing him fourth on the all time list. He is renowned also for his superb Ryder Cup performances but Montgomery has never won a major championship despite achieving the runner-up position on five occasions.

This Week's Half Price Art

 Often called the Last Patrol, the painting depicts a scene from the Boer war, showing a party of Lancers bringing a riderless horse back from patrol. Art prints reproduced by kind permission of the 9th / 12th Lancers.

The Empty Saddle by J P Beadle. (Y)
Half Price! - £25.00
On the 11th January 1879, a British Force under the command of Lord Chelmsford crossed the Buffalo River into Zululand.  A small garrison was left at Rorkes Drift.  The force consisted of 1600 British troops, mainly from the 1st and 2nd Battalions 24th Regiment, and 2500 native soldiers.  A tented camp was established at Isandhlwana Hill.  At 4am on the morning of 22nd January, Lord Chelmsford took half his force to reconnoitre to southeast in search of main Zulu army.  Just after 8am a force of 25000 Zulu warriors attacked the remainder of the force in the camp.  Surprised, outnumbered by more than six to one, in a position offering little defence, the defenders were soon overpowered and a dreadful slaughter ensued.  A few men escaped and re-crossed the Buffalo River to safety.  Victoria Crosses were awarded to Lieutenants Melvill and Coghill, who saved the Queens Colour of the 1st/24th and to Private Wassell, 90th Foot, who saved a comrade while escaping across the Buffalo River. Includes 10 printed remarques of main characters at the battle, 5 down each side.

Battle of Isandhlwana by Charles Fripp. (C)
Half Price! - £45.00
 The Old Guard being asked to surrender at the end of the Battle of Waterloo.
The Last Stand of the Old Guard by Robert Hillingford. (Y)
Half Price! - £20.00
Napoleon on the morning of Waterloo surrounded by the Imperial Guard. In fact, all the French Infantry would have been wearing their capotes (greatcoats)

Morning of Waterloo by Ernest Crofts.
Half Price! - £33.00

 Depicting soldiers of the French Second Empire dreaming of the victorious French Army of the Napoleonic period.
La Reve (The Dream) by Edouard Detaille. (Y)
Half Price! - £30.00
DHM396.  The Wounded Cuirassier by Theodore Gericault.
The Wounded Cuirassier by Theodore Gericault.
Half Price! - £25.00
Following Napoleons deposition of Ferdinand IV, King of Naples in favour of his brother Joseph Bonaparte, the British government ordered General Sir John Stuart to land a force in Calabria, Southern Italy. On the 6th of July the French force of 4,000 infantry and 1,000 cavalry met the British force of 5,000 infantry. The battle was a British victory with losses of 330, compared to the French losses of 700 killed and 1,000 wounded with another 1,000 prisoners.

The Battle of Maida by De Louthembourg.
Half Price! - £25.00
 Themistocles had chosen the narrow waters at the entrance to the bay well. The Persians could not bring their larger fleet to bear on the smaller Greek fleet and due to the design and manoeuverability of the Greek Triremes, the Greek fleet sailed down the right channel next to Salamis and turned to ram the Persian fleet as it entered the bay. The Persian captains tried frantically to turn their ships but their oars became entangled and the turning manoeuvre caused the ships to run into each other. The Greek Triremes were able to ram the leading Persian ships, disengage and ram again. This was a great victory for Themistocles who lost only 70 ships from his fleet of 380 Triremes, compared to the loss of over 600 ships from the Persian fleet of over 1,000.

Battle of Salamis, 23rd September 480BC by Wilhelm von Kaulbach. (Y)
Half Price! - £29.00

This Week's Half Price Sport Art

 At the end of the first race of the 2003 season, Neil Hodgson raises his fist in salute, serving notice that this year - 2003 - the title of Champion would be his.
Serving Notice by Robert Tomlin.
Half Price! - £30.00
 Marlboro McLaren Mercedes MP4/11. 1996.
David Coulthard by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - £25.00
 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the three-quarters stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - £75.00
 Neil Hodgson celebrates winning the World Superbike Championship at Assen, September 2003.
No.1 by Dave Foord. (Y)
Half Price! - £110.00

 

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