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Top Dressing in New Zealand (1) by Ivan Berryman. (P)


Top Dressing in New Zealand (1) by Ivan Berryman. (P)

Landing and taking off from the hillsides, rather than established airfields, this was extremely dangerous work which involved the pilot following the terrain and contours of the land that was being dressed in order to ensure an even distribution of the chemical. Australian-born Jim McMahon, served during World War II on B.25 Mitchell bombers before pioneering crop dusting and topdressing in New Zealand with ex-military De Havilland Tiger Moths which he converted himself for the purpose. He went on to form a company called Crop Culture, which specialised in aerial spraying equipment, both in New Zealand and in the UK, before becoming a partner in the newly-formed Britten-Norman aircraft company which produced the Islander and Trislander utility transport aircraft in England.
Item Code : B0032PTop Dressing in New Zealand (1) by Ivan Berryman. (P) - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original painting, gouache on art stock by Ivan Berryman.

Size 24 inches x 18 inches (61cm x 46cm)Artist : Ivan BerrymanHalf
Price!
Now : £900.00

Quantity:
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Other editions of this item : Top Dressing in New Zealand (1) by Ivan Berryman.B0032
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 35 prints. Image size 16 inches x 12 inches (41cm x 31cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman£10 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : £70.00VIEW EDITION...
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 15 artist proofs. Image size 16 inches x 12 inches (41cm x 31cm)Artist : Ivan BerrymanAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£100.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of up to 50 giclee canvas prints. Size 24 inches x 18 inches (61cm x 46cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman
on separate certificate
Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£350.00VIEW EDITION...

This Week's Half Price Art

 Harrier GR3s of No. 1 squadron in a secluded hide following a field exercise. The unique vertical take off capabilities of the Harrier allow front-line squadrons to deploy from dispersed sites.

GR3 Field Trip by Stuart Brown. (Y)
Half Price! - £60.00
 Flying as Leader of B Flight, 41 Sqn, on 15th August 1940, Pilot Officer Ted Shipman and the rest of his flight found themselves among a mass of Messerschmitt Bf.110s that had been detailed to escort a bomber force of Heinkel He111s on a raid on the North of England.  Having made one head-on attack on one of the Bf.110s, Shipman manoeuvred his Spitfire Mk.1 onto the tail of another and fired a long burst into it.  This was M8+CH of Oberleutnant Hans-Ulrich Kettling of 1./ZG76 and rear Gunner / Radio Operator O/ Gefr Volk, whose starboard engine burst into flames and disappeared into the dense cloudbase.  Shipman claimed this initially as a probable, but it was later confirmed as a victory when the aircraft was found to have crash landed at Streatham Nr Barnard Castle.  Spitfire K9805 (EB-L) is depicted breaking off the attack as Kettling's stricken Bf.110 begins to burn.  Ted Shipman would go on to serve with the Royal Air Force until December 1959 retiring as a Wing Commander.  Ted would also go onto become friends with  Hans-Ulrich Kettling, the pilot he shot down.

Tribute to Pilot Officer Ted Shipman by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £725.00
 Lockheed Vega PV-1 VB32 Squadron in the Santaren Channel. From this point on the U-boat was hunted and harassed only to be sunk in the Bay of Biscay.

The Hunt for U-Boat 134 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £35.00
 The end of an era.  British Airways Concorde G-BOAG moments before touching down at Heathrow for the very last time.

Final Touchdown by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00

A surprise dive bombing attack at 12.45pm as Spitfires of 65 squadron were taking off. 148 bombs were dropped on the airfield and hangars. The entire squadron got airborne with one exception, its engine was stopped by the blast from one of the bombs.

Battle of Britain, Manston, 12th August 1940 by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - £125.00
 easyJet is one of the largest operators of the Airbus A319 with some 142 of the type on its strength.  G-EZAM is depicted beginning its final approach.

easyJet Airbus A319 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
 Under the watchful eye of his more experienced tutor a trainee pilot gets his first taste of the Spitfire Mk.IIa, airborne from Tangmere early in 1941.  the nearest aircraft is P7856 (YT-C) which enjoyed a long career, surviving until 1945.

The Fledgling by Ivan Berryman. (B)
Half Price! - £100.00
 Routine, though essential, maintenance is carried out on a 501 Sqn Hurricane at the height of the Battle of Britain during the Summer of 1940.  Hurricane P3059 <i>SD-N</i> in the background is the aircraft of Group Captain Byron Duckenfield.  Hurricane P3059 <i>SD-N</i> in the background is the aircraft of <a href=http://www.military-art.com/mall/profiles.php?SigID=1236>Group Captain Byron Duckenfield</a>. 

Ground Force by Ivan Berryman (GS)
Half Price! - £290.00

This Week's Half Price Sport Art

 The legendary Welsh rugby union captain Gareth Edwards is brought to life in the triple portrait. Gareth Edwards is revered in Wales and considered one of the finest players ever. in part of the montage he is shown going over for a try against England.
Gareth Edwards by Darren Baker. (AP)
Half Price! - £150.00
B45. David Coulthard/ Williams FW.17 by Ivan Berryman

David Coulthard/ Williams FW.17 by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - £40.00
David Coulthard driving the 1998 McLaren MP4/13.

The Silver Arrow by Ray Goldsbrough
Half Price! - £20.00
 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the ¾ stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - £75.00

 

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