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Rain or Shine by Michael Thompson


Rain or Shine by Michael Thompson

Richard Burns and Robert Reid. Subaru Impreza WRC 99
Item Code : MT0014Rain or Shine by Michael Thompson - This Edition
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PRINT Limited edition of 500 prints.

Image size 18 inches x 10.5 inches (46cm x 26cm)Artist : Michael ThompsonHalf
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Now : 30.00

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High Flier by Michael Thompson.
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All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


This Week's Half Price Art

 Battle of Agincourt, October 25th 1415. Fought during the Hundred years war at the end of the English Invasion of 1415. King Henry the V of England, after his conquest of Harfleur marched his army of 1,000 Knights and 5,000 Archers (many of which were Welsh) towards Calais. He marched to Amiens as flooding had affected the river at the Somme which was the direct route. This delay helped the French army of 20,000 strong under the command of the Constable Charles dAlbret and Marshal Jean Bouciquaut II. The French army blocked Henry V route to Calais, giving the English no choice but to fight. Henry V positioned his army at Agincourt, between to wooded areas giving a frontage of 1100 metres. Henry deployed his force into three divisions; each group had archers at each flank. He had chosen his position well, in front of his army was ploughed fields and due to the heavy raid was very muddy. Due to the narrow battlefield area the French army lost their advantage of superior numbers. At 11 oclock the English started to advance their archers within 2509 yards of the French, getting them into range of the French lines. The French line of Cavalry advanced at a slow pass due to the heavy mud, They took heavy losses from the arrows from the English Long Bowman. They were eventually repulsed by the Archers who as the French cavalry approached changed from using longbows for axes and swords. The French second Cavalry line advanced only to be finally repulsed after hand to hand fighting. The commander Duc dAlencon was killed in the attack. The second charge had failed and many of the French knights were taken prisoner. Believing he had been attacked in the rear Henry V ordered that the prisoners were to be put to death. In fact There was no real rear attack it was French Camp followers plundering the English Camp. The French camp followers were quickly dealt with and the English again prepared itself for the next attack. The third attack never materialized as the sight of so much blood shed and piles of corpses turned the charge into a retreat. The English had won the day with losses less than 1600 compared to the French losses of over 7,000, including the capture of Bouciquaut. Henry V, his way now cleared reached Calais on the 16th November 1415. Agincourt is one of the great battles of military history, and this victory enabled Henry V to return to France in 1417 and conquer all of Normandy.

Morning of Agincourt by Sir John Gilbert. (Y)
Half Price! - 30.00
 Although outnumbered ten to one, General Arthur Wellesley defeated the well trained Mahratta army in one of the fiercest battles in India. It was the first of many victories by the future Duke of Wellington, and the bloodiest for the number, he recalled, that I ever saw.

The 74th Highlanders at the Battle of Assaye, 23rd September 1803 by David Rowlands. (Y)
Half Price! - 50.00
 Helmand Province, Afghanistan, April 2007.  Troops of 1st Battalion Royal Anglian Regiment engage Taliban insurgents from a compound roof at dusk during Operation Herrick 6.  In addition to small arms a one shot AT4 anti tank launcher is used against more difficult targets.

On the Roof by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - 700.00
 Having made contact the previous evening with troops of 4th Infantry Division pushing inland from Utah Beach, paratroopers of the 101st Airborne division The Screaming Eagles help mop up the pockets of German resistance in their general advance towards Carentan.

Screaming Eagles in Normandy, 7th June 1944 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - 75.00

Sir John Moores epic retreat to Corunna was punctuated by desperate and often heroic rear-guard actions - none more dramatic than the cavalry clash at Benevente on the 29th December 1808. Having crossed the river Esla, cold and swollen by recent rainfall, a British picquet, comprised of elements of the Kings German Legion Hussars and the 7th, 10th and 18th Hussars, covers the river and its tactically demolished Castro Gonzalos bridge from a position near the town of Benevente. Napoleon himself leads the pursuit. The Emperors elite Guard Light Cavalry, commanded by General Lefebvre-Desnouettes, is ordered at daylight to ford the river and launch a surprise attack on what appears to be the numerically inferior British units. As five-hundred and fifty French cavalry emerge in orderly fashion from the river, intent upon quickly dispatching the opposition, they are startled to find the British piquet, reinforced by a host of British cavalry, streaming from within the confines of Benevente, some on their left flank. Under the command of Lord Paget, the British become the pursuers of the surprised French, who turn and retreat with the frigid waters of the Esla blocking their escape. Unlike their crossing in echelon just minutes before, the French now in disorder plunge into the river, where many drown. Others are captured including General Lefebvre-Desnouettes who is made prisoner by Grisdale of the 10th Hussars following a dramatic pursuit. General Lefebvre-Desnouettes will eventually escape from captivity in England, to encounter Lord Paget once again on the field of Waterloo.

Sabres on the Esla Pursuit of the Imperial Guard at the Battle of Benevente by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - 80.00
 St Mere Eglise, Normandy, 6th June 1944.  U.S. Paratroops of the 82nd <i>All American</i> Airborne Division, descend on occupied France.

First to Fight by David Pentland.
Half Price! - 70.00
 This painting was commissioned by Napoleon in September 1804 and completed in 1807. The original painting is 10 metres by 6 metres, and the official title is : Consecration of the Emperor Napoleon I and Coronation of the Empress Josephine in the Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Paris on 2nd December 1804.
Coronation of Napoleon by Jacques Louis David. (Y)
Half Price! - 28.00
 The Duke of Wellington orders Maitland to move the infantry of the guard forward at the climax of the Battle of Waterloo during the Napoleonic war.
Now Maitland Now is Your Time by Thomas Jones Barker. (Y)
Half Price! - 320.00

This Week's Half Price Sport Art

 Peter Deighan has superbly captured Jimmy White, John Parrot, Stephen Hendry, James Wattana, John Higgins, Ken Doherty, Ronnie OSullivan and of course the centrepiece, a magnificent study of former World Champion Steve Davis as he Ponders his next shot.  A must for all snooker rooms, clubs and players of this wonderful game.

Kings of the Baize II by Peter Deighan
Half Price! - 80.00
 Colin McRae and Nicky Grist.  Ford Focus WRC
High Flier by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - 30.00
 The Minstrel, 1977, Shergar, 1981, Golden Fleece, 1982, .Teenoso, 1983, Reference Point, 1987, Nashwan, 1989.

Derby Winners by Peter Deighan.
Half Price! - 100.00
 A cricketing genius, Sir Garfield Sobers excelled at all aspects of the game.  One of his most memorable moments being the six consecutive sixes hit off one over.

Sir Garfield Sobers by Gary Keane.
Half Price! - 60.00

 

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