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THIS ITEM IS INCLUDED IN OUR BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE OFFER !
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Sea of Red by David Evans


Sea of Red by David Evans

Schumacher and Ferrari, the winning team.
Item Code : FAR0924Sea of Red by David Evans - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
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PRINTRestricted edition.

Image size 16 inches x 24 inches (41cm x 61cm)none£10 Off!Now : £40.00

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This Week's Half Price Art

 King Tigers of Kampfgruppe von Rosen, 3rd Company Heavy Tank Battalion 503, preparing to move out from the Tisza bridgehead to counter Soviet pressure on German forces attacking to the northwest at Debrecen during the first battles to defend the Hungarian capital of Budapest.

Tigers in the Mist by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £90.00
<b>Slightly noticeable mark on the image - hence the low price of this item. </b>

AD43 by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - £27.50
 Bastogne, Ardennes, Belgium, 20th December 1944.  Newly arrived 81mm Mortars of 2nd Battalion, 506th PIR, 101st Airborne Division, fire in support of U.S. Paratroopers defending against German probes to the north of Bastogne.

Fire for Effect by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £70.00
The Duke of Cumberland, their colonel, commanding the allied forces; measured his strength with Marshal Saxe, who was then besieging Tournay.  The First Guards were on the right of the centre, in the first line, when the Duke, furious at the failure on both wings, ordered the masses of troops to attack.  The infantry dashed forward between the village and the redoubt, and as the British Guards advanced over a low ridge, and saw the French Guards before them, a scene occurred which has become legendary in military history. 'Messieurs les Anglais, tirez les premiers!' is a phrase that bespeaks the old fashioned chivalry with which foemen worthy of each other's steel loved to treat one another.  The story of what occurred is variously given.  'The officers of the English Guards,' says Voltaire, 'when in the presence of the enemy, saluted the French by taking off their hats.  The Comte de Chabannes, and the Duc de Biron, who were in advance returned the salute, as did all the officers of the French Guards.  Lord Charles Hay of the King's Company, 1st Guards, stepped forward and took off his hat.  Lord Charles Hay then pulled out a flask and drank a toast to the French, saying: 'Gentlemen of the French Guard, I hope you will wait for us today and not escape by swimming the Scheldt as you swam the Main at Dettingen.'  Then he turned to his Company and said: 'Men of the King's Company, these are the French Guards and I hope you are going to beat them today.'  Count D'Anteroche, lieutenant of grenadiers, replied in a loud voice:  'Gentlemen, we never fire first; we will follow you.'  The French troops opened fire first but most of their shots went high.  Then the British troops opened fire and nineteen officers and up to 600 men of the French Guards are said to have fallen at the first discharge, as the English pushed on, the enemy were borne back, and in the face of a terrific fire, the Guards drove them into their camp. Here, exposed to the tremendous reverse fire of the redoubt of Eu, the Guards according to Rousseau, formed themselves into a kind of square, and resisted repeated attacks of the cavalry of the French Guards and Carabineers.  But unsupported and decimated by the withering hail of iron that assailed them, attacked by fresh troops and the Irish brigades of Clare and Dillon, beset as in a fiery furnace, the Guards at length began to retire.  They did so in perfect order; but the First Guards left 4 officers, 3 sergeants and 82 men dead on the field, besides having 149 wounded in all.  It was a defeat due to bad generalship and want of cohesion among allies, but its sanguinary episodes added new lustre to the great fame of the Guards. 'There are things, 'says Marshal Saxe, - or some say his friend General D'Heronville, in his Trait des Legions - 'which all of us have seen, but of which our pride makes us silent because we well know we cannot imitate them.'  Fontenoy was a defeat for the British army.  During the battle Lord Charles Hay was wounded but would later be in action again.

The Battle of Fontenoy by Felix Philippoteaux.
Half Price! - £33.00

 B Company, 1st Battalion The Kings Own Scottish Borderers, Al Uzayr, Iraq, 9th August 2003.
Corporal S G Jardine CGC by David Rowlands. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
9th (Irish) Field Battery firing on the Run-in-shoot to Queen Beach. They were the first rounds fired at the Normandy Coast, D-Day 6th June, 1944. Queen Beach, one of the 4 sectors of Sword Beach, where most of the landings of D-Day were carried out. The Queen Beach sector which extended for 1.5km between Lion-sur-Mer and the western edge of Ouistretham. The attack was thus concentrated on a narrow one-brigade front. For once the DD tanks and other armour came in exactly on time and ahead of the infantry. The 8th brigade, with the 1st Battalion of the South Lancashire Regiment on the right and the 2nd East Yorkshire on the left.

Operation Overlord by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
Depicting the Light Brigade at the moment of reaching the Russian guns. Shown are the 11th Hussars and the 17th Lancers.  The all time classic image of the disastrous  Charge of the Light Brigade which included the 17th lancers, who lead the charge.  Lord Cardigan is shown on the left, dressed in his 11th Hussars uniform.   The Light Brigade were being kept in reserve, after the successful charge of the heavy brigade, but the slow advance of the British Infantry to take advantage of the heavy brigades success had given the Russian forces time to take away Artillery pieces from captured redoubts.  Raglan, after seeing this ordered the light brigade to advance rapidly to the front, follow the enemy and try to prevent the enemy carrying away the guns. This message taken by Captain Nolan, to Lord Lucan, the cavalry Commander.  One of the Officers of Raglans Staff, urged Lucan, who could only see the main Russian Artillery position at the head of a valley.  Lord Lucan rode over to Cardigan and ordered him to attack these guns.  So the Light Brigade charged these Russian guns, and not the guns being taken away by Russian forces from the redoubts. The carnage was great, from the 673 men who started the charge, 113 men were killed and many others wounded. The Light Brigade was made up of the 4th and 13th Light Dragoons, 8th and 11th Hussars and the 17th Lancers. A spectating French Officer General Pierre Bosquet proclaimed - It is magnificent but it is not war.

Relief of the Light Brigade by Richard Caton Woodville (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Commissioned for the 25th Anniversary, Army Dog Unit, RAVC Northern Ireland, 1973-1998.

Search and Secure, Army Dog Unit by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £40.00

This Week's Half Price Sport Art



Lester Piggott by Gary Keane. (Y)
Half Price! - £65.00
 Nigel Mansell leads the pack in his red No.5 Williams on the first lap of the 1992 British Grand Prix, closely followed by the McLarens of Ayrton Senna and Gerhard Berger, with the No.19 Benneton of Michael Schumacher in fourth place.  Mansell went on to win this race, with his team-mate Ricardo Patrese taking second.  Senna retired 7 laps from the end, while Schumacher finished 4th ahead of Berger in 5th.

The First Lap - Nigel Mansell and Ayrton Senna, British Grand Prix, Silverstone, 1992 by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
Race horses gallop to the finish shown in this racing painting by Mark Churms.

The Finish by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - £20.00
Racing at this pretty and ancient venue dates back as far as the mid 14th century, making it the oldest racecourse in Britain.  Bounded by the River Dee and a Roman city wall, the <i>Roodee</i> is the tightest and smallest course of all.  The oldest record of a race here is that for a prize of a silver bell woth 111 shillings on Shrove Tuesday in 1540, continuing until 1609.  The completely flat track is only a shade longer than a mile and can cause problems for larger horses that often find it difficult to get into their stride.  In longer races, the competitors pass the standds no less than three times covering nearly two miles and three furlongs.  The most famous of the <i>long</i> races is The Chester Cup, first run in 1824, being the highlight of a three day meet in May.

Chester by Paul Hart.
Half Price! - £55.00

 

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