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Massive savings on this month's big offers including our BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE offer on many prints, many others at HALF PRICE or with FREE PRINTS and all orders over £150 get FREE WORLDWIDE SHIPPING!
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Original art work for the book A Time of War Vol II, Come Evil Days by Chris Collingwood.


Original art work for the book A Time of War Vol II, Come Evil Days by Chris Collingwood.

Item Code : CC0089Original art work for the book A Time of War Vol II, Come Evil Days by Chris Collingwood. - This Edition
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original oil on board. Some marks in top right hand corner. Image size 25 inches x 19 inches (64cm x 48cm) Artist : Chris CollingwoodHalf
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Now : £900.00

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This fantastic original painting is part of our huge original collection of over 350 paintings.
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This Week's Half Price Art

GDHM3013GL.  Lance Missile Launcher, 50th Missile Regiment Royal Artillery by David Rowlands.
Lance Missile Launcher, 50th Missile Regiment Royal Artillery by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Abram M1A1 tanks and Bradley APCs of Charlie Company, the Cobras, 1-64 Desert Rogues Armoured Battalion, US 3rd Infantry Division (Mechanised) drive into central Baghdad, through Saddams famous war memorial.

Through the Hands of Victory, Baghdad, Iraq, 7th April 2003 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 The Battle of Isandlwana on 22 January 1879 was the first major encounter in the Anglo-Zulu War between the British Empire and the Zulu Kingdom.  Eleven days after the British commenced their invasion of Zululand in South Africa, a Zulu force of some 10,000-12,000 warriors attacked a portion of the British main column consisting of about 1,800 British, colonial and native troops and perhaps 400 civilians.  The Zulus were equipped mainly with the traditional Assegai iron spears and cow-hide shields, but also had a number of muskets and old rifles though they were not formally trained in their use.  The British and colonial troops were armed with the state-of-the-art Martini-Henry breech-loading rifle and two 7 pounder artillery pieces as well as a rocket battery.  Despite a vast disadvantage in weapons technology, the numerically superior Zulus ultimately overwhelmed the poorly led and badly deployed British, killing over 1,300 troops, including all those out on the forward firing line.  The Zulu army suffered around 350 killed, and up to several hundred wounded.  The battle was a crushing victory for the Zulus and caused the abandonment of the first British invasion of Zululand.

The Battle of Isandlwana by Jason Askew. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 A convoy makes contact with the enemy in Sangin Valley, Helmand Province, Afghanistan.

Contact - Helmand Province by Graeme Lothian. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00

 Background battle detail shows 15th Hussars in summer campaign dress.

Lt General Lord Wellington at Salamanca, 22nd July 1812 by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 This painting shows all the elements that make up a support brigade, in this case 101.  The role of the support brigade is to receive both troops and equipment into theatre and organise their onward movement.  They logistically sustain the fighting formations on the front line.  This unit's badge is the 'Blackadder' snake after the television comedy programme.

101 Logistic Brigade by Graeme Lothian. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Australian VC winner-Private Albert Jacka, 14th battalion.  He killed nine Turks who had bombed and infiltrated an Australian trench at Courtneys post during the great Turkish assault on 19th May.

Gallipoli - Courtneys Trench by Jason Askew. (GM)
Half Price! - £300.00
Wearing patched white trousers and gaiters made of mattress ticking. In the mid distance, officers of the Polish Lancers and the Guard. Napoleon stands on the distant cliff. To the right a ship flies a tricolour. The Elba battalion was Napoleons bodyguard in exile, comprising six companies of Guardsmen, 100 artillery men and a crew of 21 seamen, They formed the nucleus of the Imperial Guard in 1815.

A Grenadier of the Guard at Elba by Horace Vernet.
Half Price! - £33.00

This Week's Half Price Sport Art

 The Meteor, vintage racing schooner.
A Soldiers Wind by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the three-quarters stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - £75.00
Race horses gallop to the finish shown in this racing painting by Mark Churms.

The Finish by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - £20.00


Portrait of David Coulthard by Robert Tomlin. (P)
Half Price! - £280.00

 

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